Tim Counts: Why Christians get excited about Easter

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Just over three months ago, my family and I were wondering if we would get our first white Christmas after three years in Vermont. As I write this today, we have 18 inches of snow on the ground and my kids are amazed by the mountains of snow on the edges of the church parking lot. There is no doubt that cabin fever has set in, as the prospect of snow on the ground for Easter is looking more likely each day. Yet I have begun to hear what I have come to expect from the resilient people of Manchester and the mountains: "Another storm next week, but spring is coming."

This is always said with a twinkle in the eyes, a twinkle of hope. There is snow on the ground now, but the peas will be planted in the ground before too long. That's just how it is some years.

I can't help but see a faint shadow of resurrection hope in our sure hope for the arrival of spring. The reason that Christians get so excited about Easter is because we need to be reminded that although we live in brokenness now, resurrection is coming. It's the same attitude that can say with snow on the ground, "Another storm next week, but spring is coming." Easter is the reason that Christians can face difficult things with a twinkle in our eyes, "Another diagnosis of cancer, but resurrection is coming." The reason we can be resolute in our faith when life is hard is exactly because of the resurrection.

Crucial resurrection

Sometimes even Christians forget how crucial the resurrection is to our faith. We need Easter to remind us that the resurrection is promised, and it matters. The Apostle Paul explained this in the Bible, "And if Christ has not been raised, then our preaching is in vain and your faith is in vain" (1 Corinthians 15:14). Paul doesn't say that if the resurrection is not true then at least Christians are bringing some good into the world, so keep doing what you're doing. No, he says if the resurrection is not true, let's pack it up. Let's close our doors. But then six verses later he exclaims, "But in fact Christ has been raised from the dead "

I experienced the weight of the resurrection a few years ago as I stood with a 17-year-old at a headstone. We had just had coffee. I was checking in on him one on one because his mother had passed away a couple of months earlier. As we sipped the last remains of our Frappuccinos, he had surprised me by asking, "Do you want to go with me to my mom's grave?" When we arrived at the cemetery, there was grass from the lawn mowers strewn across the headstone, so I watched as he bent down and gently cleaned off her name. We stood in silence for a few moments, talked about her for a few minutes, and then I prayed with him, thanking God that because of Jesus' resurrection he would see her again.

So you will have to excuse us if we get excited about Easter. You would be excited too if you believed that you would be raised from the dead. Easter means so much more to us than a change in the weather, or a poetic metaphor of new life. Spring weather and metaphors of new life have their place, but we know that they won't give us the rock solid hope that we need when we stand in front of the grave of a loved one. We have something better to celebrate, which is the resurrection of our savior Jesus-- and we know that his resurrection means that we have the hope ofresurrection.

Just before he raised Lazarus from the dead, Jesus comforted Lazarus' grief-stricken sister Martha with words that no mere man has ever been able to repeat, "I am the resurrection and the life. Whoever believes in me, though he die, yet shall he live, and everyone who lives and believes in me shall never die." (John 11:25-26). Then he asked her the key question, "Do you believe this?" Christians get excited about Easter because we do believe this, and Easter reminds us that as surely as the snow will melt into spring, resurrection is coming.

Tim Counts is the Pastor of Northshire Baptist Church in Manchester.

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